Beat the dreaded summon auntie with free phone app

Beat the dreaded summon auntie with free phone app

The Summon Auntie phone app is helping to unite drivers against the island's ominous parking wardens

Remember to help out fellow drivers when you see a Paddington Bear approaching. Driving in Singapore is expensive.

What with the ridiculous Certificate of Entitlement (COE), the escalating Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) and rising cost of fuel.

So you can't blame Singapore drivers from dodging the odd parking fee.

That's where the Summon Auntie phone app comes in.

A free app created by Replaid for iPhones and iPads -- where's the love for Blackberry and Android phones? -- the app alerts fellow drivers near their vehicles if a potential parking warden (popularly known as summon aunties), and a parking fine is heading their way.

Possibly one of the best uses of crowd sourcing, the execution is simple. Once you've parked your vehicle, launch the app and click on Park to lock down your vehicle's position in the app database.

You have to Unpark your car when you vacate the parking spot.

You're alerted of the impending warden when a fellow motorist spots one approaching, and clicks on a prompt to set off an alert.

The alert goes to other users within 200 meters. Cue the mad rush of drivers to their vehicles whose parking time has expired.

Otherwise you're back to pleading for leniency and begging auntie "why you no pan chance?"

To download the Summon Auntie app, click here.

 

In between sunning herself in the Caribbean, Bali and other exotic locales, Charlene Fang keeps her feet (and fingers) grounded as the managing editor of inSing.com. She blames her wanderlust on the years spent working as the editor of CNNGo Singapore and Time Out Singapore. Her ramblings have also been published by the likes of Travel+Leisure, Condé Nast Traveler, Wallpaper*, ELLE and The Australian.

Read more about Charlene Fang
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