Singapore, the underwater city of the future

Singapore, the underwater city of the future

It's not as far-fetched as it sounds -- there's already a real underwater city in Bulgaria
Will we all start swimming like Jar Jar Binks and take jet-skis to work?

A city under the sea?

We've heard the news about how Singapore may develop into a network of underground cities linked by railway systems, following recommendations from the Economic Strategies Committee that the island state explore the use of more subterranean space. But now there's a notion being floated that we can become an underwater city as well.

According to Associate Professor Chu Jian of the Nanyang Technological University's School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the possibility is very real and achievable. "At the moment we're only using the top shallow depths. In fact we can go deeper, as much as 100 meters, depending on the geological formation," he said to Today Online.

The idea is not a new one, as an underwater city in Bulgaria has already been created. "Underground cities are not expensive, if done on a large scale -- [it's] the same as for land reclamation in the past, " associate professor Chu added. Strong seawalls could be built to block the water, creating space for shopping malls, factories or storage space. 

One suggested location is the existing Keppel and Pulau Brani area, which will be turned into a Tanjong Pagar Waterfront city once its lease expires in 2027. Due to the years of container work carried out there, the ground -- which was used for heavy-duty work -- can be converted into foundations for high-rise buildings, according to Chu.

All Singapore will need after all this is a renaming. Atlantis 2.0? 

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