5 ways to go green at the Hong Kong Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture 2009

5 ways to go green at the Hong Kong Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture 2009

Get hands on with spreading eco-awareness by checking out highrises nearby -- or reaching out as far away as Kenya -- at these biennale events
Shenzhen Hong Kong biennale
Grow your own organic greens at the Kadoorie Farm.

1. Greening upwards -- Check out the Green Panel System, a new technology by local design firm Strongly that enables the construction of vertical gardens, perfect for a high-rise city like Hong Kong.

2. Get your hands dirty -- by learning how to grow your own organic vegetables with the Kadoorie Farm, which is offering free workshops at the biennale site on December 13th, 18th and 27th, and January 10th, 12th and 31st. If you can't make any of those workshops, check out some of the regular workshops and activities the farm holds on the slopes of Tai Mo Shan.

3. Reaching Africa -- Take a look at Xu Bing's Forest Project, which uses the internet to sell Kenyan children's tree-inspired artwork to people in developed countries. The money is then used to buy trees for needy communities back in Kenya. Xu will host workshops related to the project every Sunday from now till January 10th, between 11:30am and 1:30pm.

4. Bench warmer, not global warmer -- Have a seat on Jason Carlow's Urban Picnic bench, which is specially designed for the streets of Hong Kong and is made with an eco-friendly mix of bamboo and Corian, a kind of artificial material made with acrylic and aluminum. Carlow will keep adding pieces to the bench throughout the biennale. 

5. Speak out -- Make your voice heard and discuss the aftermath of the Climate Change Conference, which is currently taking place in Cophenhagen, at an event hosted by the Hong Kong Green Building Council on January 16th between 2pm and 3pm.

Christopher DeWolf is a writer, photographer and self-styled flâneur.
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