Airbus Concept Plane: The future of commercial flight?

Airbus Concept Plane: The future of commercial flight?

Airbus' idea of future flight: Zen gardens in the sky, body-heat power and morphing seats
Airbus Concept Plane
The Airbus Concept Plane -- reality or really far out?

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner has finally landed, but what will the air passengers of 2050 look for in a commercial plane? If one asks Airbus, passengers of the future will go gaga over their Airbus Concept Plane. The design is intended to improve environmental performance with ultra long and slim wings, semi-embedded engines and a U-shaped tail resulting in a lower fuel burn, a cut in emissions and less noise.

Airbus also suggests that ‘green’ energy sources might power some systems on tomorrow’s aircraft, hinting that even passenger's body heat could play a role.

Where things get really compelling is inside the Airbus Concept Plane. Airbus talks of "morphing seats made from ecological, self-cleaning materials, which change shape for a snug fit; walls that become see-through at the touch of a button, affording 360 degree views of the world below; and holographic projections of virtual decors, allowing travelers to transform their private cabin into an office, bedroom or Zen garden!"

A Zen garden? Sure why not. We could all use a little more Zen when we fly. We'd also like to make a formal request for soundproof "baby-bubbles".

Can't wait until 2050? For some, the future of air travel is already here in the form of FAA approved and street legal "air-cars". Not quite Zen gardens in the sky, but it will do for now. 

Airbus Concept PlaneThe Airbus Concept Plane has a far more realistic looking design than what "futurists" imagined flight to look like 40 years out from the 1950s.

Chris Anderson is the former associate editor of CNNGo based in Hong Kong and is now senior editor at Huffington Post Media Group.

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